Research Areas

Global map with multi-colored flows connecting global manufacturing firms.

Digital Political Economy


This area of research encompasses various projects that bring a political economic lens to digital technologies, with particular attention to the spatial dimension. These projects explore questions such as the creation of new digital markets, the legal frameworks for the commodification of data, and the economic geographic impacts of new technologies such as autonomous vehicles and small and micro satellites. Through a critical perspective that combines various methods and theoretical approaches, we are interested in shedding light on how digital technologies contribute to shape spaces,  how spaces are continuously shaped by these technologies, and who has power over these processes.
Tilemaps displaying Google Street View and Mapillary Coverage in World Cities. There are two charts stacked on top of each other, one representing Google Street View coverage and the other representing Mapillary coverage. The charts are grids, where each row is a city and each column represents a road type. The cells are colored based on Mapillary/Google Street View coverage, with darker colors representing higher coverage. The Google chart is more darkly colored, with most cities well covered with the exception of cities in India, China, and the Dominican Republic. The Mapillary map is lightly colored across most of the cities, with the exception of major roadways.

Critical GIS


Geospatial data, media, and technologies are being used at unprecedented levels and in increasingly complex contexts, directly and indirectly impacting our everyday lives. Power structures are encoded within these data and technologies, which shapes differential, uneven, and unjust spatial geometries. We use and analyze geospatial tools to address questions of power and difference across a range of areas. Through this work, we aim to unsettle, disrupt, and reimagine dominant approaches to open data, remote sensing, map design, and spatial justice.
Screenshot of a scrollytelling map of wool production in 1845. Map shows the northeast United States with the Erie Canal and Ohio Canal highlighted.

Visual Storytelling


Maps and geospatial data like satellite imagery saturate digital journalism. Despite the ubiquity of mapping in journalism, we know little about the politics and processes of their creation, how they have changed over time, and the broader impact of news maps o on our understandings complex spatial stories. Drawing our backgrounds in data journalism and critical mapping, we explore the everyday processes for mapping the news as well as the everyday encounters with news maps.




Publications


Media & Outreach


Publications 


Media & Outreach


Publications


Media & Outreach